Skip to content

Two scenarios for the future of HE

November 3, 2010

Let us examine two possible scenarios:

Scenario 1

The government arranges to increase payments to Universities and reduce tuition ‘top-up’ fees for students. Lib Dem MPs are able to hold their heads up about their pre-election promises on student fees. The argument is made that, already, graduates give a return of up to three times the cost to the public purse in repaid taxes over their working lives. It is understood that graduates are not the sole beneficiaries of their education, but that society gains qualified professionals who bring about innovations in healthcare, in ecological design, in education, they sustain our engineering and manufacturing industries, and contribute to one of the world’s most successful entertainment industries, and so on. Society benefits from a well supported HE system.

Michael Arthur, vice-chancellor of the University of Leeds, and chairman of the Russell Group of top universities, tells the BBC’s Today programme that the plans were a “very important development”.

He said: “What this does is send a very loud signal that the government recognises the importance of higher education to the future of our country, its economy and our ability as universities to help the country out of recession.”

Scenario two

Students in universities in England face tuition fees of up to £9,000 per year from 2012, as the government reveals its plans for higher education. Universities will be able to charge £6,000 per year with a higher tier of £9,000 – nearly treble existing levels – if poorer students receive support. Lib Dem MPs are told they face a backlash from students. Much of this rise in fees will replace public funding withdrawn from universities in last month’s Spending Review. It will mean that many arts and humanities courses will now depend on fee income, rather than state funding.

Michael Arthur, vice-chancellor of the University of Leeds, and chairman of the Russell Group of top universities, told the BBC’s Today programme that the plans were a “very important development”.

He said: “What this does is send a very loud signal that the government recognises the importance of higher education to the future of our country, its economy and our ability as universities to help the country out of recession.”

 

Unfortunately, the second scenario came true today. Join the Demonstration next week on 10 November.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: